New logo!

New logo!

I pretty much only come here to post Halloween photos anymore. So here you go.

peoplelookingatcitibike:

New Yorkers react to Citi Bike.

Pretty much this, right?

peoplelookingatcitibike:

New Yorkers react to Citi Bike.

Pretty much this, right?

bikesandgirlsandmacsandstuff:


(via “Bike to the Future” Jane’s Ride this Saturday | Brooklyn Spoke)


Come ride with me this Saturday. It will be fun. That is all.

bikesandgirlsandmacsandstuff:

(via “Bike to the Future” Jane’s Ride this Saturday | Brooklyn Spoke)

Come ride with me this Saturday. It will be fun. That is all.

ohhleary:






(Previously.)
dougmoe:

Biking Pet Peeves and How to Avoid Peeving
Stop before the crosswalk.  We’ve already decided that you are not going to cross before the light changes, so stop before the crosswalk so you don’t piss off pedestrians.
Ride with the flow of traffic.  1st Avenue goes one way.  2nd Avenue goes another way.  It’s not hard to go one block over so as not to be a dick to everyone.  You will see plenty of these dicks, so do not be one of them.
Don’t keep passing me if you are slower than me.  Nothing is more annoying than having a really slow biker on a big chunky POS classic crappy bike get in front of me at every intersection just so I have to pass them again a block up.  This is not a big bike race.
Lock your bike up the right way!  Look this up.  Always always lock your bike up.  Read and work it out.  Seeing sloppily locked bikes makes ME want to steal them, and I already have a bike.  You will learn this lesson the hard way like me:  I had my bike stolen from my backyard because it was behind a gate, but otherwise unlocked.  Then I used a crappy lock to lock up my wife’s bike temporarily and they came back and stole that.
Don’t dip in and out like you’re tracing the contours of the parked cars.
Don’t wear headphones.  Your sweet jams are gonna get you fucking killed.
Ring your bell a lot to let people know you are coming.
Get lights for front and back if you are going to be out at night.  Back lights for cars to see you, front lights for pedestrians to see you coming.
Be nice, be polite!  Don’t yell at old ladies:  ”Bike lane!  Bike lane!”  That’s someone’s grandma, you lout!  Be a model biker.  Thank people for moving.  Ding your bell and say thanks.  Spread generosity and love around.  Treat your politeness as a deeply sarcastic manifestation of your hatred for all the dummies out there.
What did I miss?

Probably nothing. I enjoyed this list very much.

dougmoe:

Biking Pet Peeves and How to Avoid Peeving

  • Stop before the crosswalk.  We’ve already decided that you are not going to cross before the light changes, so stop before the crosswalk so you don’t piss off pedestrians.
  • Ride with the flow of traffic.  1st Avenue goes one way.  2nd Avenue goes another way.  It’s not hard to go one block over so as not to be a dick to everyone.  You will see plenty of these dicks, so do not be one of them.
  • Don’t keep passing me if you are slower than me.  Nothing is more annoying than having a really slow biker on a big chunky POS classic crappy bike get in front of me at every intersection just so I have to pass them again a block up.  This is not a big bike race.
  • Lock your bike up the right way!  Look this up.  Always always lock your bike up.  Read and work it out.  Seeing sloppily locked bikes makes ME want to steal them, and I already have a bike.  You will learn this lesson the hard way like me:  I had my bike stolen from my backyard because it was behind a gate, but otherwise unlocked.  Then I used a crappy lock to lock up my wife’s bike temporarily and they came back and stole that.
  • Don’t dip in and out like you’re tracing the contours of the parked cars.
  • Don’t wear headphones.  Your sweet jams are gonna get you fucking killed.
  • Ring your bell a lot to let people know you are coming.
  • Get lights for front and back if you are going to be out at night.  Back lights for cars to see you, front lights for pedestrians to see you coming.
  • Be nice, be polite!  Don’t yell at old ladies:  ”Bike lane!  Bike lane!”  That’s someone’s grandma, you lout!  Be a model biker.  Thank people for moving.  Ding your bell and say thanks.  Spread generosity and love around.  Treat your politeness as a deeply sarcastic manifestation of your hatred for all the dummies out there.

What did I miss?

Probably nothing. I enjoyed this list very much.

(Source: dougmoe)

brendanmc:

sbnation:

Wow, this week’s Sports Illustrated cover. 

Wow.

brendanmc:

sbnation:

Wow, this week’s Sports Illustrated cover. 

Wow.

Turn off the cameras, put down the microphone and let a father grieve.

With all of the acts of kindness, small and large, that seem to have emerged since yesterday, the fact that dozens of reporters and camera people are reportedly filling a residential driveway waiting for a comment from Martin Richard’s father provides the starkest of contrasts. To have the need to ask a parent how he feels about losing his eight-year-old son just so you can fill out a news segment and bring “drama” to an already too dramatic event is the very opposite of kindness. It is selfishness at its most disturbing. As a father, this outrages me. As a human, this outrages me.

If one lesson of Boston — and Sandy Hook and Aurora and 9/11 and and and — is that we can not control evil but can, in fact, control our reaction to it, then the media has a lot to learn.

transportationnation:

This just in: New York City’s bike share program is now accepting members. The first 5,000 will get a discount on helmets.

The total cost of yearly membership is $103.43 with tax, which puts it just under the cost of a monthly Metrocard.

Next month’s system launch will include 6000 bikes at 330 stations in Manhattan south of 59th street and in Dumbo, Downtown Brooklyn, Prospect Heights, Fort Greene, and Bedford-Stuyvesant.

(Above photos: city transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan dons a sporty helmet and uses a key card to unlock a bike from its dock in Brooklyn.)

For more: http://ow.ly/k59Ba 

Not surprisingly, I am now a member.

99percentinvisible:

On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, “Go outside, and play in the streets. All day.”

And then the automobile happened.

(Source: 99percentinvisible)